Excerpts from an interesting article.


I ran across an article with a title I simply could not ignore. Michael Reeb penned a piece entitled, I’m a Lifelong Democrat. Here Are 3 Reasons I Pulled the Lever for Trump. The pundits who were wrong about everything during the last election cycle could benefit from reading this article.

[Italicized portions are directly from the Reeb article] My reasons for going Trump this election cycle weren’t a surprise to my hometown friends in Rust Belt Butler, Pennsylvania, home of the world’s first Jeep. In Butler, we’ve seen the destruction of our middle class, the loss of our factories, and the pollution of our clean water… the population has shrunk nearly every year since the 1970s.

Reeb calls what is happening in the town in which he was born, Hometown Humiliation.

Trump proved to be different, and unpredictably so. Fate would have it that the very last person I would have predicted to show love for the common man would be one of the world’s richest men. A businessman who seems to have been hurt the least by our nation’s outsourcing has become a champion of the working class.

I have never seen anyone running for office attacked like Donald Trump. As I watched him absorb these slings and arrows, I thought that Trump must really want to help Americans, else why would he eschew his enviable lifestyle to endure this punishment. All of the evil motives ascribed to him by the lame stream media made no sense.

Did Trump blunder? Daily! But his ultimate atonement was that he showed love for the American people and is a patriot. It’s a lot easier to forgive a blundering candidate hugging the American flag in a room full of blue-collar Americans, than one hiding in the back of a 737 dodging press questions… His candidacy was the beginning of the healing process for humiliated hometown America, which had been desperate to find a champion… Our economy had sold us out, and not just in terms of income or the American dream. 

I was shocked to find a Trump openly criticizing the economic policies that have led to America’s economic decline. He spoke of jobs being lost to China and Mexico, and asked one of the most biting economic questions I’ve ever heard in my life: “When was the last time you saw a Chevy car in Tokyo?”

(Clinton’s) accusations of sexism against Trump followed by her complete, open-armed endorsement of Miley Cyrus and the hardly-PC Jay-Z revealed her selective moralism. Those paying attention saw that Clinton’s posture of indignation was simply that: a posture.

To many lifelong Democratic voters, Clinton was morally unrecognizable. In political terms, she was the epitome of lukewarm—which, if anything, meant she would not stand up for hometown America.

Those of us that voted for Donald Trump recognized that he had “thin skin.” Only a portion were enamored of his “tweets.” And we didn’t like his “locker room talk about women.” But we understood that we weren’t electing a replacement for Jesus. We were electing a replacement for someone who thought he was Jesus and in so thinking had nearly brought our beloved nation to rack and ruin.

Roy Filly

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About Roy Filly

Please read my first blog in which I describe myself and my goals.
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2 Responses to Excerpts from an interesting article.

  1. trailbee says:

    My personal impression of why we lost so much to outsourcing is that companies felt strangled by the unions, government and otherwise. I honestly believe they, the unions, are quietly awaiting the return of their old membership. Then, will we see the exact same flight of jobs as before?

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